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Career Colleges and Vocational Schools in Australia

Below is a list of schools that match what you are searching for:

Contact: Australian College of Property & Finance

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The College has been created to provide property and finance education to people who are wanting to either become full time property investors themselves, or are looking at maximizing their spare time to make extra wealth in property. WE are the premier provider of Higher Learning for all things property & finance! About us: Founded in 2004, The College has partnered over 5,000 clients worldwide in generating over $250 million in property deals. With our Community...
Study Programs: Finance, Real Estate Management


Contact: Australian International Conservatorium of Music

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The Australian International Conservatorium of Music (AICM) is a non-profit, independent conservatorium, committed to providing world-class educational opportunities. The school has designed various degree programs, master classes and events that ensure a challenging, vibrant, and stimulating environment for students. AICM follows the mission to produce some of the world’s best musicians, performing artists, composers, and teachers. Specialized training is provided to those, wishing to...
Study Programs: Music


Contact: Billy Blue School of Graphic Arts

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Billy Blue School of Graphic Arts was established when a company called Billy Blue Creative decided to start a small design school with the purpose of training people, who would then go on to work at the studio. The amount of people, who enrolled greatly exceeded the initial expectations and this is how the school kept on growing. The institution was created by industry for industry, promoting professional teaching and high educational standards. The courses offered at the school include...
Study Programs: Graphic and Industrial Design Engineering, Multimedia


Contact: Einstein College of Australia

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Einstein College welcomes all who wants to study here at Melbourne, in Australia. We are an acknowledged educational institute, providing economical course training to students of all ages. Courses that which we offer here are adeptly or meticulously designed by subject experts to make your learning experience an enjoyable activity.
Study Programs: General Education, Language Teaching


Contact: Holmesglen

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Holmesglen, Australia
Located in Victoria, Holmesglen is one of its main providers of vocational and higher education since 1982. Degrees and certificate courses can be obtained in Arts, Business, Construction and Horticulture among others.
Study Programs: Accounting, Art Studies, Arts and Crafts, Building Construction, Business Administration, Communications , Computer Programming, Computer Science, Cosmetology, Creative Arts, Culinary Arts, Design, Drafting, Early Childhood Education, Electronic Engineering Technology, Engineering Science, Event Production, Fine Arts, Food Sciences and Technology,...


Contact: Taylor Weir School of Hairdressing

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Study Programs: Hairdressing


Contact: The Percy Institute of International Protocol

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Study Programs: Protocol


Contact: William Blue International Hotel Management School

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Study Programs: Hotel Management


About Career Colleges and Vocational Schools in Australia

Most of the vocational schools and career colleges in Australia come under the umbrella of the TAFE (Technical and Further Education) system. TAFE is a broad network of institutions including privately-operated job training centers and a number of programs provided by the government, both of which are held to the same high standards of quality and reliability. The country’s educational authorities establish tests and core competencies that guide curriculum development for all career colleges and vocational schools, and these in turn are based on a set of necessary skills and branches of knowledge that are identified by employers and the state as critical to have in the Australian workforce. There are thousands of programs spread throughout the country, although naturally they are concentrated in high-density urban areas such as Sydney, Melbourne, and Perth. However, Australia’s economy is heavily dependent on agriculture, so rural areas have many training centers for people who hope to become ranchers, farmers, or skilled agricultural leaders. 
 
Unlike many countries, which have a vocational track at the level of secondary education (technical high schools, or something of the kind), Australia has very few vocational schools aimed at teenagers and high school students. Most programs assume that students will finish their standard academics at the secondary level, get a diploma, and then choose whether they want to go on to vocational training or college. This enables young Australians to keep their options open until after they finish high school.
 
The government of Australia is very careful to ensure that all institutions, degrees, and instructors are reliable. While considerable freedom is afforded to individual schools to set their own curriculum and decide on their teaching styles, the Australian government requires that all instructors pass a competency test and hold certifications in the skill that they are teaching. The skills themselves and the choice of what programs will be available is left entirely up to industry itself – the government does not attempt to manage or control what skills students will learn or what kinds of workers will be hired. Instead, the marketplace creates a demand for certain kinds of workers and the schools respond accordingly. This guarantees that any certificate or diploma awarded by a technical school will be honored by prospective employers, and that alumni will truly have the skills they need to succeed after graduation.
 
Educational ministries at the national, state, and local level are all coordinated through the National Center for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), which functions both as a source of valuable knowledge and as a channel of communication. Authorities at different levels of government can always refer back to NCVER guidelines and statistics in order to optimize their programs. Individual schools can also use this information to their advantage, and the reliance of both government and private sector institutions on the NCVER is evidence of the admirable balance that has been struck in Australia between the “free market” model of education and the quality assurances that can be provided by strong central regulation.



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