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The Languages spoken in Trinidad and Tobago

The population of the islands, though diverse, is primarily composed of West Indians that hail from Africa and the rest, East Indians. Roughly 17% of the population is made up of various groups of people, mostly from Asia, particularly China and the Middle East, and Western Europe. The languages of the islands are, as expected, diverse in nature too. English is the primary language used in Trinidad and Tobago, although in various parts of the islands, some Spanish, French, and Hindi dialects are also spoken.

Hindi is a language of Indo-Aryan origin and is the second most widely used language in the world. The Constitution of India even hails it as one of the world's two official languages of communication beside English. Hindi is very popular in the islands and words derived from this language are an essential part of everyday speech.

Owing to the long years spent under the French conquerors, the people of Trinidad and Tobago have been well exposed and accustomed to the French language. Hence, there is such a language known as Trinidadian Creole French. Natives in the northern villages of Trinidad are the major speakers of this local tongue. These regions of the island are mostly fishing communities and other nearby settlements along the island's coast, west of Port of Spain. This language is more commonly known as French Patois or French Patwa.

Being the first conquistadores of the islands, the Spanish likewise left major impacts on Trinidad and Tobago's culture and society. The Spanish influence is apparent up to this day, specifically in the island's language. While there are relatively fewer parts that still use the language, a lot folk songs, names of places, food, and the like are either directly written in or are derived from Spanish. Moreover, the very slight distance separating Trinidad and Tobago from South America also plays a part in this continuing influence.


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